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Chris Milam Performs at the Coffee Shoppe

Chris Milam Performs at the Coffee Shoppe

Chris Milam performs his original music this Friday, October 16 with Jonah Grinkewitz at the Coffee Shoppe located at 300 High Street in Olde Towne Portsmouth. Performances begin at 5:30 through 8:00 pm. For more information, call 757-391-9191 or visit their website at...
45th Annual Seawall Art Show August 22nd & 23rd

45th Annual Seawall Art Show August 22nd & 23rd

Sat – 10 AM – 6 PM | Sun – 10 AM – 5 PM  This juried fine arts and fine crafts show on Portsmouth’s waterfront in Historic Olde Towne features the works of nearly 100 talented artists working in oil paintings, wood-carving, hand woven clothing, art glass, fine jewelry, pottery and more. Includes a student art show, food and entertainment....

Coast Guard Tall Ship ‘Eagle’ Visits Olde Towne Portsmouth, VA

August 19 thru 21, 2015 USCG Eagle, also known as “America’s Tall Ship” is the largest tall ship flying the Stars and Stripes and the only square-rigger in U.S. government service. The ship was built in 1936 in Germany, and commissioned as Horst Wessel, one of three sail training ships operated by the pre-World War II German navy. At the close of World War II, Horst Wessel was taken as a war reparation by the United States, recommissioned as the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and sailed to New London, Connecticut. Eagle provides an unparalleled at-sea leadership and professional development experience for future officers of the U.S. Coast Guard. Come aboard and tour this magnificent Tall Ship while she is anchored in Portsmouth. The USCG Eagle will be docked on the south side of the High Street Ferry Landing, in front of the Hog Island Lighthouse Pavilion and Skipjack Nautical Wares & Marine Gallery. For more information please call...
Commodore Theatre Chosen as One of 10 Movie Theaters Nationwide With Seriously Awesome Food

Commodore Theatre Chosen as One of 10 Movie Theaters Nationwide With Seriously Awesome Food

Olde Towne Portsmouth’s Commodore Theatre was recently selected as one of 10 movie theaters with seriously awesome food by MSN.com! We concur, and as one of the Commodore’s most frequently visited fans, I can say without a doubt that the movie experience is equally as awesome as the food. The Commodore Theatre was also recently named one of the “10 greatest dine-in theaters in America” in a Motion Picture Association of America publication (2014) and one of America’s 7 Best Movie Theaters of Food Lovers,” in a 2013 issue of Bon Appetit Magazine. Here’s the link to the article at MSN.com . Follow the link here to the Commodore Theatre for current movie now playing: Commodore Theatre....
Visit the New Commodore James Barron Mural

Visit the New Commodore James Barron Mural

A new mural depicting Commodore James Barron was recently commissioned by The Supporters of Portsmouth Public Art. The mural presents Commodore Barron in the foreground with the ships HMS Leopard and American frigate USS Chesapeake behind was created by Chesapeake, Virginia artist Sam Welty, who has also created a number of other exceptional murals throughout the historic Olde Towne district.  You can view the now completed mural at 612 Court Street, Olde Towne Portsmouth, VA.  Commodore James Barron. Namesake of the Commodore Theatre on High Street, James Barron is best known for an infamous incident at sea in 1807, when his ship, the frigate Chesapeake, surrendered to the British warship Leopard after firing only one shot. Four former British sailors serving aboard the Chesapeake were tried for desertion and impressed into the British Navy. The nation and President Thomas Jefferson were outraged at the British action. Historians consider the “Chesapeake-Leopard Affair” a catalyst of the War of 1812. Barron was later court-martialed for his actions and barred from further command. In 1820, Barron killed Commodore Stephen Decatur, who testified against him at his court-martial, in a duel in which he also was injured. Barron went on to a successful second career as commander of the Gosport Yard, now the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. He is credited for suggesting warships be clad with iron sheeting. He died on April 21, 1851, at age 82. He is buried in the graveyard of Trinity Episcopal Church located on the corner of High and Court Streets, also referred to as Church Square! History re-printed from an article written by Lia Russel, Virginian Pilot, October 10, 2011. Photograph...
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